Wincheap

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Wincheap
Wincheap, looking towards the railway bridge - geograph.org.uk - 746919.jpg
Wincheap is located in Kent
Wincheap
Wincheap
Location within Kent
Population9,095 (Ward 2011)[1]
District
Shire county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townCanterbury
Postcode districtCT1
PoliceKent
FireKent
AmbulanceSouth East Coast
List of places
UK
England
Kent
51°16′23″N 1°04′13″E / 51.2730°N 1.0704°E / 51.2730; 1.0704Coordinates: 51°16′23″N 1°04′13″E / 51.2730°N 1.0704°E / 51.2730; 1.0704

Wincheap is a road and suburb in Canterbury, Kent, England. The road forms part of the A28 road, stretching for around 1 mile (1.6 km) from the city wall, close by Canterbury East railway station, to the over-crossing of the A2 and the parish of Thanington Without.

History[edit]

There are two theories about the name: either it comes from the Saxon Wenchiape, a wine market, or from Weychep from the old English Waegnceap, indicating a wagon market.[2]

Wincheap originated as an ancient trackway to the east of the River Stour. In Roman Britain it was used for communication between Canterbury and the iron works in the Weald.[2] The modern street was established by the early 13th century; the name is recorded starting in 1226.[3] Wincheap Gate, since demolished, was one of the entrances in the city walls.[4] A timber market was held halfway along Wincheap in the 13th century, while an annual cherry fair took place on Wincheap Green until the early 19th century. The green was destroyed during construction of the Canterbury Ring Road in the 1960s.[2]

Since 1996, most of Wincheap from the railway bridge to the A2 bypass has been marked as a conservation area by the city council.[5] There is a petrol station halfway along the road, which has been criticised for having a negative effect on the area.[6]

Properties[edit]

The King's Head

Nos. 50–52 were constructed in the 18th century and were originally a single house. They are three storeys high and constructed of red brick. They were Grade II listed in 1973.[7]

Wincheap House at No. 74 was constructed in the 16th century. Originally a timber-framed building, it was extensively rebuilt in the 18th century, though the overhang of the top two floors was retained, as was the 16-panelled front door. The premises was Grade II listed in 1949.[8]

Nos. 96–116 date from the early 18th century, and are a group of two-storey brick houses that are a mixture of painted, stuccoed and roughcast, included hipped tiled roofs. They were Grade II listed in 1973.[9]

Nos. 160–164 are a terrace of early 19th century red brick houses. No. 160 has a more decorative door than the others. The terrace was Grade II listed in 1973.[10]

The Thanington Hotel is at No. 140. It dates from the early 19th century and is a three-storey building rendered with cement. It was Grade II listed in 1967 along with Nos. 126–136.[11][12]

The King's Head Inn at Nos. 198–204 Wincheap was established around the early 15th century and is believed to be the city's oldest continuously trading inn.[13] The timber-framed exterior was re-fronted in the 18th century, preserving the overhang of the first floor. The building includes a tile-hung rear elevation. It was Grade II listed in 1967.[13][14]

Wincheap House

The Wincheap Non-Conformist Burial Ground sits alongside the King's Head on the west side of Wincheap. It was established in 1849 and contains 281 graves; the last burial occurred in 1962. It was restored in 1997 and financed by the National Lottery Heritage Fund.[6]

Nos. 268–274 form a terrace of red brick houses. They were constructed in 1771.[5]

The Hospital of St James by Canterbury was based at the southern edge of Wincheap where the road meets Thanington. It was established in the 12th century for female lepers, and maintained by three priests. It survived the dissolution of similar hospitals during the reign of Henry VIII, and closed on 28 February 1551 under the reign of Edward VI. All premises and all possessions were surrendered to the crown.[15][16]

The Thanington Pumping Station was based at the edge of the conservation area at the southeast part of Wincheap. It opened in 1869 and was designed by Samuel Collett 千亿体育官网rsham. It was demolished in the 1990s and replaced with a small retail park.[5]

A telephone box at the north end of Wincheap by the railway bridge was Grade II listed in 1989. It was built in 1935 by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott and constructed from cast iron.[17]

References[edit]

Citations

  1. ^ . Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 11 September 2016.
  2. ^ a b c Canterbury 2010, p. 116.
  3. ^ Johannes Knut Wallenberg (1931). . Upsala universitets årsskrift. 1931:2. Uppsala: Lundequist. p. 5.
  4. ^ Henry Boswell (1795). . London: Hogg. OCLC 221287121.
  5. ^ a b c Canterbury 2010, p. 118.
  6. ^ a b Canterbury 2010, p. 119.
  7. ^ Historic England. . National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 25 February 2020.
  8. ^ Historic England. . National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 23 February 2020.
  9. ^ Historic England. . National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 23 February 2020.
  10. ^ Historic England. . National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 23 February 2020.
  11. ^ Canterbury 2010, p. 120.
  12. ^ Historic England. . National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 23 February 2020.
  13. ^ a b . Canterbury Journal. 14 July 2018. Retrieved 23 February 2020.
  14. ^ Historic England. . National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 23 February 2020.
  15. ^ 'Hospitals: Hospitals in and around Canterbury', in A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2, ed. William Page (London, 1926), pp. 209–216. British History Online [accessed 23 February 2020].
  16. ^ Edward Hasted, 'Parishes: Thanington', in The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 9 (Canterbury, 1800), pp. 21–27. British History Online [accessed 23 February 2020].
  17. ^ Historic England. . National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 23 February 2020.

Sources

  • (PDF) (Report). Canterbury City Council. 12 October 2010. Retrieved 23 February 2020.